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Client stories

Mampi’s sweet success

Mampi’s sweet success

Mampi took a loan of INR 30,000 from ASA India 2 years ago when she and her husband required funds to invest in their wholesale Indian sweet making factory. With this investment, they were able to add a machine to their ladoo making, which led to extra income generation. When the demand for sweets from their shop increased, they were able to increase the number of staff. Once her loan was fully repaid, Mampi took another loan, and along with the profit from their factory, she opened a local sweet shop in the market. Now her husband takes care of the sweet making factory, and Mampi manages the shop. They have employed several staff members who work in their factory as well as in the shop. She plans to open more sweet shops in the future.

From small repair shop to local department-like store

From small repair shop to local department-like store

Runu Rani and her husband had a small electronic repair shop in which they invested the money Ranu received as her first loan from ASA India 8 years ago. With the money from the loan and the profits from their shop, they were able to add more products to sell alongside their repair business, such as mobile phones, recharge coupons, DTH coupons etc. Moreover, they were able to build their house, which ultimately opened new doors. When she recognized their shop was running well, Runu decided to open another shop in an empty room on the ground floor of her house. In this shop, she and her husband sell electronic products and have a repair department. Additionally, Runu has a separate area within the shop where she has a sewing machine and takes orders for dressmaking. She was able to purchase the machine using her loan. Meanwhile, Runu’s shop keeps evolving, as she realized the demand for basic day to day goods in her shop as well. The shop has become popular locally, as people find it useful to visit her mini department-like store. In the future, Runu wishes to add more products to her shop and continue supporting her graduating daughter’s education.

Minati’s fruits and more…

Minati’s fruits and more…

Minati took her first loan from ASA India four years ago, when she initially needed to support the fruit business primarily run by her husband and son. The family had a fruit shop at the local market and the money was used to procure raw materials such as particular varieties of fruits in response to the local demand. In the following years, they decided to open more shops and Minati took another loan from ASA India. Over the years, they employed staff in their shops and Minati worked along with her husband and son. With her current loan, Minati has opened a fruit shop for herself, where she is responsible for managing the business. She procures special varieties of fruits from Kolkata market as there is a high demand for those fruits in the local areas. Minati now wishes to diversify her business interest and wishes to open another business alongside her fruit business.

Shilpa’s entrepreneurial spirits

Shilpa’s entrepreneurial spirits

Five years ago, Shilpa and her husband wanted to move their old mobile phone shop from their local area to a bigger market nearby at Barasat. They realized this need for expansion, so Shilpa took a loan from ASA India. Over the years, she repaid her loans on time and continued to take loans to grow the family business. One year ago, Shilpa decided to open a dress shop after anticipating demand for women’s garments in the nearby area. It is not possible to visit Kolkata all the time to purchase good quality dresses or garments, but women in the local area do want these products. With the profit from her family business and an additional loan from ASA India, Shilpa opened her shop. Within one year, her shop has become pretty popular locally. The locals appreciate the products she arranges from Kolkata. At the moment, she runs the shop on her own. In the future, she wishes to employ staff as well.

Shyamali’s resilience and skills

Shyamali’s resilience and skills

Shyamali lost her husband very early in her life and had limited means to support her family while working part-time to make ends meet. After taking a loan from ASA India, she opened a small tailoring shop. She employed a tailor for making the products and she was responsible for the administrative management of the shop. Within a few years, her shop was a success and she didn’t fail to pay her instalments once. She took a loan from ASA India again to add more machines to the shop. Until then, Shyamali was not trained in tailoring and, hence, could not work at her own shop, apart from managing the shop. She was selected for a skill development training program that ASA India was conducting for the borrowers who lost their husbands, and she was provided with training on tailoring. Upon successful completion of the training, Shyamali was supplied with a professional tailoring machine from the joint CSR program of ASA India and Lions Club. She added that machine to her shop and started making dresses along with her team. Later with a new loan, she started making school bags as well. At this moment, she works along with her team and has added a separate section to her shop where she sells products like rice, pickles, butter, etc. Her son is now managing the business along with her.

From a manual sewing machine to full-fledged factory

From a manual sewing machine to full-fledged factory

Eight years ago, Asma took her first loan of INR 15,000 from ASA India. With the loan, Asma purchased four manual sewing machines and started her business in dressmaking. Once the business started making a profit, her husband also joined her. Within seven years' time, Asma increased the business and now has 15 high-quality machines in her dressmaking factory. She has employed more than 15 women in her business who work for her full-time. In addition to that, Asma also diversified her business interest and has started a poultry business. While Asma looks after the dressmaking business, her husband takes care of the poultry business. After seven years, she now has a full-fledged factory and wishes to make it bigger. Her most recent loan from ASA India increased to INR 50,000.